Java EE Training CoursesJava EE Training Courses –
Onsite, Tailored, Low Cost.

Overview of Java EE Development

JavaServer Pages

Java Servlets

Developing Java Web Applications

Introduction to JSP

The JSP Standard Tag Library

JavaServer Faces

Java Message Service

Securing Java Web Applications

Secure Java Web Development

The Java Persistence API

JPA With Hibernate

Java EE Persistence

Java EE Persistence with Hibernate

Enterprise Java Beans

This curriculum covers technology specified in the Java Platform, Enterprise Edition, including Java Servlets, JSP, JSF, JMS, and EJB. All courses are available in primary forms that run using the appropriate reference implementations: for web technology this is the Tomcat web container, and for JMS and EJB it is the Java EE SDK and GlassFish.

We also offer vendor-specific versions of the courses listed here, supporting popular Java EE products such as TomcatGlassFishJBoss, and WebLogic.  For more details, and to find a desired server-specific version of a course, see our server-support.

For courses on the Java language (knowledge of which is a prerequisite for most of this curriculum), see the Java Curriculum Guide.

J2EE Web services include both Java and XML topics and are found in the XML Curriculum Guide.

We also offer courses in some of the most popular open-source application frameworks, including Struts, Spring, Hibernate, and various Ajax application frameworks. These are found in our Frameworks Curriculum Guide.

Other courses to explore:

Developing RESTful Services with Spring Training

Introduction To Spring Training – Onsite, Tailored, Low Cost

JPA With Hibernate Training – Onsite, Tailored, Low Cost

 From Wikipedia – Java Platform, Enterprise Edition (Java EE), formerly Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition (J2EE), is a set of specifications, extending Java SE[1] with specifications for enterprise features such as distributed computingand web services.[2] Java EE applications are run on referencing runtimes, that can be microservices or application servers, which handle transactions, security, scalability, concurrency and management of the components it is deploying.

Java EE is defined by its specification. The specification defines APIs and their interactions. As with other Java Community Process specifications, providers must meet certain conformance requirements in order to declare their products as Java EE compliant.

Examples of contexts in which Java EE referencing runtimes are used are: e-commerce, accounting, banking information systems.

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